THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

HISTORY OF MICROBLADING

A Brief History of Microblading
Microblading first rose to prominence about 25 years ago throughout Asia. Its history is not well-documented in the US, and it doesn’t help that it’s gone by so many different names: microstroking, feather tattooing, eyebrow tattooing, “the Japanese Method,” feathering, hairstroking… the list goes on. In Asia, the technique matured as artists experimented with different brow patterns and tools and application techniques.

A lot of modern techniques are now taken for granted and commonplace. Originally, many artists would cross hairstrokes in an “x” pattern, since in real life hairs do cross. However, this would injure the skin and looked less natural. These days, most artists are taught never to cross hairstrokes.

Today, more advanced techniques such as “3D Eyebrows” are popular throughout the United States. Newer techniques are still being innovated in of Asia, such as the “6D Eyebrow” by artists like David Zhang.

In the last few years, microblading had a surge of popularity throughout Europe, where schools and artists have established themselves as the frontier of microblading for the West. In 2015, microblading finally caught on and overtook "permanent makeup" in Google searches:
Bloggers and YouTubers began experimenting with this procedure, while new artists started advertising their work and putting up websites for the first time.

The history of microblading is very brief, but its future looks very bright.

IS MICROBLADING PAINFUL?

Many people ask us: is microblading painful?

Most of our clients report little or no pain. Since the procedure takes a couple hours, some clients have literally slept through it! We leave a topical anesthetic on the eyebrow area for 20 minutes before we begin the process, so this leaves most clients numb during the procedure. However, if your artist begins within that 20 minutes, or if you find that you’re very sensitive, you may report mild discomfort.

MICROBLADING AND PREGNANCY

A question we hear all the time is, “Can I get microblading while I’m pregnant?"

Our policy at Microblading Lounge is we do not perform microblading during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. This is the policy for most permanent makeup artists if you research online. In truth, there is very little scientific medical research on tattoo ink and pregnancy, nor is there any research on the ink we use (the ink in microblading is different from tattoo ink). Until there is clarity on the subject from medical professionals, our policy remains no.

Then again, if your artist is booked many months in advance, you may need to wait until after pregnancy anyway! ;)

WHO SHOULD AVOID MICROBLADING?

While microblading is great for most people, there are some people who are ineligible for microblading:

Those prone to keloids or post-inflammatory hypopigmentation. Unfortunately, since microblading punctures the skin as we add ink, we cannot work with clients with these conditions.

If you have a transmittable blood disease such as HIV or Hepatitis. Again, microblading artists cut the skin so it is our policy not to work with these conditions.

If you’ve had Juvederm or other fillers in that area. Depending on the timing, we recommend to get microblading first! Otherwise, check with your doctor. Many artists may request a note from your doctor first.

Patients undergoing chemotherapy. Although microblading is great for restoring eyebrows, we would require a doctor’s note in order to perform the procedure for anyone undergoing chemotherapy.

If you have any kind of skin condition on or near your eyebrows. This includes eczema, shingles, rashes, or anything else near eyebrows.

Children. Microblading is for adults only! We do not recommend microblading for anyone under the age of 18. It is our policy at Microblading Lounge will not work with children, even with a consent form.

MICROBLADING VS TATTOOING

We hear people sometimes refer to microblading as eyebrow tattooing, which is technically true but not 100% accurate.

Technically, microblading is eyebrow tattooing, but microblading is not like any eyebrow tattoo.

Let’s talk about the key differences.

1. Microblading artists hand draw each line. Eyebrow tattooing uses a machine.

This makes a big difference. Microblading features very fine lines and when applied by a skilled artist, those lines do not “bleed out” over time. Not true of traditional eyebrow tattooing. Eyebrow tattooing is usually done by a machine, with much greater injury to the skin. The lines created are not as fine and over time begin to bleed out. If you’ve ever seen someone tattoo handwriting on their skin, only to see the writing get thicker over the years, then you know the effect.

2. Microblading usually doesn’t last as long.

The fine lines of microblading typically fade over time. For most, they fade over 1 to 3 years. In truth, with microblading, there is a lot less ink deposited under the skin in fine lines. In the dermis, where the ink is placed, this ink is moved around over time. When there is a lot of ink, like in traditional tattooing, the tattoo remains very much permanent. With microblading, the ink often fades and disappears, depending on the skin type.

3. Inks maintain their color.

Microblading uses a different kind of ink that maintains its original hue over time. Many tattooing clients report that their tattoos turn blue or brown over time. With microblading, however, colors tend to get lighter, rather than changing hue.

4. Microblading is less painful.

Microblading artists use a topical anesthetic, which numbs clients of most of the pain. In fact, many clients report little or no pain. Some people fear traditional tattoos on certain parts of their body because of the pain, but this is typically not a inhibiting factor for microblading clients.

5. Results from microblading are more natural than traditional eyebrow tattoos.

Again, each hairstroke is hand drawn in microblading. To the naked eye, these individual hairstrokes blend right in with a clients' real hair. While eyebrow tattoos may look more like traditional permanent makeup, microblading looks more like natural eyebrow hair.

6. Microblading artists are not necessarily tattoo artists and vice versa!

Microblading and tattooing each take specific training and are not linked! Microblading artists do not learn how to tattoo during their training and likewise, most tattoo artists never learn the skills necessary to become a microblading artist. For the noted differences, tattooing and microblading are each separate artforms that take their own time and training to master.

 
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